Thirst Might Not Be the Best Indicator of Whether You’re Hydrated

Thirst Might Not Be the Best Indicator of Whether You’re Hydrated

When it comes to staying hydrated, “just drink when you’re thirsty” has been a rule of thumb for years. Yet a recent study by University of Arkansas researchers may prove that thirst alone is not a reliable indicator of proper hydration levels.

In the study, “Dehydration Impairs Performance, Regardless of Thirst,” published in the journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Stavros Kavouras, director of the Hydration Science Lab at the U of A, and his team studied seven cyclists exercising in hot, dry conditions. The cyclists were “blinded” to their hydration status by the use of a nasogastric tube that delivered body-temperature water directly into their stomachs. One group received adequate water through the tube, and the other group did not. In order to suppress their natural thirst, all of the cyclists were given 25 milliliters of water, about five teaspoons, to drink every five minutes.

Even though they didn’t feel thirsty, the cyclists who were not given adequate water through the nasogastric tube performed worse on speed and power output (as measured on stationary bikes). They also had higher core temperatures than the cyclists given adequate water.

Kavouras points out that some researchers believe performance impairment is mainly caused by two factors other than dehydration. The first is the feeling of thirst itself. “You are thirsty, you feel miserable, thus you are not motivating yourself to perform well,” he explains.

The other factor that is commonly cited for imparing physical performance is the belief that dehydration is bad for you. “When you know that you are dehydrated, you might convince yourself to perform badly,” he says. “What is original with our study is we were able to eliminate both of those conditions.”

The small sample size in well controlled studies of this nature is not unusual, Stavros said. “We had enough statistical power that we were able to find statistically significant differences even with just seven subjects.”

Maintaining good hydration by drinking enough water during exercise is critical for optimal performance and body temperature regulation, according to Kavouras. Since different people have different sweating rates during exercise, there is no one-size-fits-all advice for hydration.

“Drinking only to thirst typically leads to significant dehydration, which is associated with exercise performance impairment,” he says. “For optimal performance, competitive athletes should develop their own individualized hydration protocol to best address their fluid needs during exercise.”

Dr. Stavros Kavouras

Dr. Stavros Kavouras

Professor and director of the Hydration Science Lab

The Hydration Science Lab is studying the mechanisms by which water intake affects health and performance. Dr. Kavouras is the author of more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and has given lectures in 28 countries. He is a section editor of the European Journal of Nutrition and program coordinator for the Exercise Science program. His training includes: Post-doctorate from Yale University, School of Medicine; PhD from the University of Connecticut, and MS from University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Dr. Kavouras is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine & the European College of Sports Science as well as elected member of the American Physiological Society, the American Society of Nutrition, and the Obesity Society. He is also an adjunct professor in Medicine at the University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Division of Endocrinology.

About The Author

An alumna of the U of A who enjoys writing about nearly everything.

University Relations Science and Research Team

University Relations Science and Research Team

Matt McGowan
science and research writer
479-575-4246, dmcgowa@uark.edu

Robert Whitby
science and research writer
479-387-0720, whitby@uark.edu

Looking for an expert?

The University of Arkansas Campus Experts website is a searchable database of experts who can talk to the media on current events.

Trending Topics:
Mars
State and local economy
Environmental economics
Immigration politics

More on University of Arkansas Research

Visit the office of Research & Innovation for a complete list research awards and more information on research policies, support and analytics.

Connect with Us